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Accession number 1996.001
Catalog Number 1996.001.004
Object Name Letter
Title Bossier, Pierre-Buard Letter
Scope & Content Photocopy of letter from Pierre Bossier to Alexandre Buard from Pierre Bossier. Original is written in a mixture of French and English, with a little Spanish and Cajun. Typed transcription is included.

Bossier discusses the death of their Aunt Placide, the U.S. Congress, John Quincy Adams, and the Whig Party in general. The translation written in italics (first version, below) is the accepted translation, and was a combined effort of several people.

Washington City D. C. February S, 1844
My Dear Alexander (Alexandre),
With great pleasure I received your letter of the 14th of January from La Havana, because it makes me aware of your hope of getting well. When I learned through Ovide's letter that you had left for that good climate, I hurried in writing to him so that you would decide to go on the trip, with the conviction that this the trip would contribute more to your recovery than all the drugs of the world together.
For me, my good friend, the climate of Washington (D. C.) has not been more favorable than the one in Louisiana, to the contrary. My health is maybe worse than when I left to come here. But since my indisposition comes from my bad stomach, my sickness may not be as dangerous as the first symptoms of yours could seem to be, but it is not less tenacious and sometimes, lets me think that there will not be any true good health for me anymore. But let's hope that it will not happen on that way and that, with time, and with prudence I will be able to get well. May you, my good friend, recover your health, and get back to meet with your wife and children, that this separation must have saddened.
I received a letter from Lecomte(Louisiana), a few days ago, dated from the 14th of February, telling me of the death of our poor aunt Placide who died on the 13th at 6 o'clock in the morning, may God give her grace and mercy in the other world, as a reward for her suffering on this earth that is one of pains and miseries and for the virtues that she knew so well to use in this world. Lecomte tells me that her death was beautiful even to be envied, he says. So it is, our good old aunt is not anymore, she leaves behind her only adoptive children and nephews and neices to cry for her and appreciate the qualities of her heart.
Finally, Lecomte tells me of your departure from New Orleans that he already knew and tells me that everything is going well in Natchitoches. There is nothing very interesting in Congress, Mr. Adams and Giddings, the two acknowledged abolitionists of the Chamber are always presenting their petitions for the abolition of the 21st regulation of the Chamber which refuses to receive petitions asking for the abolition of slavery in the United States. What a famous old rascal, that J. Q. Adams and the whole clique of the Whigs of the Congress of the United States, especially when one remembers that during a term they had the imprudence of assuming for themselves the name of the party of Decency. Me, I assure you that Mr. Adams, is only a ruthless buffoon that has never been appreciated for his true worth because he would have never been the president of a free and independent people. I would like the good Whig inhabitants of Louisiana to be here to see him do silly things in the Chamber on the question of slavery, I am almost sure that they would all return cured from Whigism.
Mr. Calhoun, retired from his candidacy to the presidency declaring in his manifesto that he will not support any candidate who would not be for free trade, Free Trade. Here is enough to know that he is not for Clay. On what he can mean about Free Trade, I don't know if he intends a reduction in tariff or what. I assure you that his position is too abstract for me to start defining it. It is, therefore, decided that the only contenders will be Clay, and Van Buren; what will be the result, time will only decide. Present, please, the regards of an old friend to Doctor Normand, tell him I am pleased to know that he is in good health and seems to continue. Tell him that I am always as before, without complaining, that I want to tell him he has neglected me by not writing a bit of line for more than 12 months.
Be well, and try to return in good health and so your friend Henry. to Alexander (Alexandre) Buard
Your Uncle and friend, P. E.Bossier

My dear Alexander,
I received with a great deal of pleasure your letter from Havana in which I learned that I have the hope that you are starting on a program to recover your health, when I learned by a letter from Qvide that it was a question of your leaving for that better climate. I was impelled to write to him at once before you decided to leave for the voyage, with the conviction that this round will contribute more to the recovery of your health than all the drugs of the of the combined [school of medicine].
For me, my dear friend, the climate of Washington is not more favorable than that of Louisiana. On the contrary, my health is perhaps worse than when I left to come here. But as my illness comes from my bad stomach, my malady is not perhaps as dangerous your first symptoms. But they are no less tenacious and I believe many times that there will never be anymore true health for me. But let us hope that it [n'en sera pas ainsi et ] will never reoccur, and that with time and prudence I will be able to reseat myself, as they say, [dans mon assiette.](maybe `in the saddle'or ` at the table').That you could, my dear friend, recover your health and return to rejoin your wife and children, who this separation will affect greatly.
A letter received from Lecomte, several days ago dated the 14th of February told me of the death of our poor Aunt Placide who died on the 13t" at 6 o'clock in the morning. That God would grant her grace and accord her mercy in the other world the recompense her for her suffering on this earth of the sorrows and misery and the virtues that she knew so well how to put into practice in the world Lecomte told me that her death was good, yes, one to be envied, he told me. As this is the case, our poor and good aunt is no more. She left no one after her except adopted children and nephews and nieces to cry for her and to appreciate the qualities of her heart.
Finally, Lecomte told me of your departure from New Orleans, that he had already known, and told me that all is going well at Natchitoches.
There is nothing very interesting at Congress. Mr. Adams and Giddings, the two avowed abolitionists of the Chamber, are always presenting their petitions on abolition to the Z lgt rule of the Chamber, which refuse to receive the petitions demanding the abolition of slavery in the U. S.What a famous old rascal (rabble) is that J.Q. Adams and all the clique of Whigs in the U.S. Congress! Especially when one recalls that these men had a time ago the imprudence to assume the name of the "parry of decency". Me, I assure you that Mr. Adams is only a buffoon, a vulgar person, who has never been appreciated at his true value [in a negative sense), because he has never been the president of a free and independent people.
I wish the good Whig inhabitants of Louisiana were here, to see him make his clownish actions in the Chamber on the question of slavery. I am (almost certain) that they would return all healed of Whigism. Mr. Calhoun has retired from the presidential candidature, declaring in his manifesto that he will not support a single candidate who is not in favor of free trade. In this it is enough to know that he is not for Clay.As for what he could intend on free trade, I don't know if he intends a reduction in the tariff or what.I assure you that his position is too abstract for me to (entereprenne) attempt to define it. It is therefore decided that the only competitors will be Clay and Van Buren. What will be the result? Only time will decide.
I pray you to present the salutations of an old friend to Doctor Normand, who I am very comforted to learn enjoys good health and who appears to be making his way (in the world, doing well).Tell him that I am always the same as in the past, [my health is the same as always] ,without at the same time pitying me, [tell him] that I say to him that he has neglected me in not writing to me a scrap (or bit) of a line in more than 12 months.
(Carry yourself well) and try to return in better health, and the same for you companion Henry. Dear Alexander,

I received your letter from Havana, which informed me that you were starting on a program to recover your health, with a great deal of pleasure. Then I learned from Ovid's letter that it was a question of you leaving for a better climate.I was impelled to write to you at once, before you decided to leave on the voyage and tell you that I am convinced that this trip will contribute more to your recovery than all the drugs of the whole school of medicine.
As for me, my dear friend, the climate of Washington DC is no better than that of Louisiana. On the contrary, my health is perhaps worse than when I left to come here. But as my illness is caused by my stomach, my sickness is perhaps not as bad as (yours when they first appeared OR when yours first appeared). But my symptoms are no less tenacious, and many times I think that I will never apin be in good health. But let us hope that it will never reoccur, and that with time and prudence I will bQ back to my old self again. I wish that you, my dear friend, could recover your health and could return=te rejoin your wife and children. The separation must affect them very much.
Several days ago I received a letter from Lecomte, dated the 14t' of February, which told me of tWdeath of our poor Aunt Placide. She died on the 13th at 6 o'Clock in the morning. May God grant her gtdce and accord her mercy in the other world as compensation for her sufferings in this earth of sorrows and misery



People Bossier, Pierre Evariste Jean-Baptiste (Gen.)
Buard, Alexandre
Bossier, Lecomte
Adams, John Quincy
Calhoun, John
Clay, Henry
Lexicon category 8: Communication Artifact
Lexicon sub-category Documentary Artifact
Inventoried date 2009-08-01